Bill to tackle gambling harm watered down

KATE CHAPMAN
Last updated 05:00 18/06/2013
Chris Tremain
Internal Affairs Minister Chris Tremain.
Te Ururoa Flavell
CAMERON BURNELL/Taranaki Daily News
Te Ururoa Flavell

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The Government is promising more reform of non-casino gambling after a watered-down bill was reported back to Parliament yesterday.

Internal Affairs Minister Chris Tremain and Maori Party MP Te Ururoa Flavell are due to announce a harm-minimisation package tomorrow.

That comes after a weakened version of Mr Flavell's Gambling Harm Reduction Bill was reported back from the commerce select committee.

Prime Minister John Key said National and the Maori Party had found "some common ground".

"I think the way Te Ururoa would see it is that . . . he's got some wins."

The bill aimed to return the proceeds of pokie machines to the communities they were made in and give local authorities more control over gambling operations.

But the committee rejected the plan to return 80 per cent of profits, instead allowing for regulations to ensure more of the proceeds returned to the same geographical area.

It also ruled out imposing the use of pre-commitment, player tracking, or other harm-minimisation devices, saying it would be "premature to mandate specific approaches".

And it ruled out removing horse racing from the list that could receive gambling profits.

Labour reserved its decision on supporting the bill but the Greens will now vote against it.

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