Law extends orders on child sex offenders

ANDREA VANCE
Last updated 11:16 17/01/2014

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High-risk child-sex offenders are set to face parole-like conditions for more than 10 years.

The first extended supervision orders (ESOs), handed down in 2005, are due to run out next year. This means the Department of Corrections will lose its ability to manage those child-sex offenders in the community.

Corrections Minister Anne Tolley will introduce a law change that will allow ESOs to be expanded beyond their current maximum 10-year time frame. They will apply to child-sex offenders who pose a high risk of serious reoffending.

There will be no limit on the length of time, but the courts will have to regularly review the need for the orders.

The orders will also be extended to include the management of high-risk sex offenders and very high-risk violent offenders.

"Corrections need to be able to continue the management of a small number of high-risk child-sex offenders for as long as necessary beyond the 10-year limit, and this legislation will enable that," Tolley said.

Once a high-risk offender comes to the end of their sentence, Corrections must apply to the courts for an ESO.

Conditions are imposed by the Parole Board, which can include residence, employment, association and exclusion zones under GPS tracking.

Tolley intends to amend the Parole Act 2002.

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