Motorhome blaze at Tahuna campground prompts warning

Nelson station officer Dick Lyall inspects the burnt interior of the motorhome at the Tahunanui Beach Motor Park.
BRADEN FASTIER

Nelson station officer Dick Lyall inspects the burnt interior of the motorhome at the Tahunanui Beach Motor Park.

Firefighters are reminding motorhome owners of the importance of smoke alarms after a fire broke out on a converted bus at Tahuna Beach Holiday Park.

Fire crews in Nelson extinguished the fire shortly after neighbours noticed smoke and flames coming from the stationary motorhome at 10.30am on Wednesday.

The occupant of the motorhome was not on site but is understood to be an elderly man.

Firefighters at the scene of the motorhome fire at the Tahuna Beach Holiday Park.
Braden Fastier/Fairfax NZ

Firefighters at the scene of the motorhome fire at the Tahuna Beach Holiday Park.

The motorhome was in a cul-de-sac at the estuary end of the camp.

The blaze shattered one of the windows, and the interior was partially fire and smoke damaged.

Fire Services investigator Craig Piner said it was likely the motorhome would no longer be liveable.

He said the fire was not suspicious but investigations into the cause were continuing.

"It's a good reminder for people who are living in these types of homes to install a smoke alarm," he said.

"If this fire had of happened at night it could have been a completely different story. If there was a smoke alarm in this home it's likely neighbours would have been able to call it in sooner as well."

Piner said it was "very easy" and affordable to install a smoke alarm. An escape plan was also an essential safety requirement when living in a caravan.

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In 2015 a man died at the Club Waimea Caravan Park in Richmond when an awning fire engulfed his caravan.

Following the incident Piner said every caravan should have a photoelectric smoke alarm installed as opposed to an ionisation smoke alarm, as the photoelectric alarms "look" at smoke where ionisation alarms "smell" it.

Having an escape plan with an alternative exit and something to break a window with was important, as often the front door could be blocked by the fire, he said.

He said a fire extinguisher should be kept by the front door.

 - Stuff

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