Flood turns Saxton Stadium into 'bomb site'

01:03, Apr 24 2013
Nelson floods
Staff wade through flood waters inside Copyart on Queen St, Richmond.
Nelson floods
Flooding at Three Brothers Corner, Richmond.
Nelson floods
The pond at Washbourn Gardens is transformed into a lake just one hour into the storm.
Nelson floods
Cars partially submerged at the top of Queen St, Richmond.
Nelson floods
A 4WD ute makes its way through a torrent of water at the top of Queen St, Richmond.
Nelson floods
A slip blocks the road on the Takaka Hill.
Nelson floods
The Richmond Mall car park was rapidly filled with rising flood water.
Nelson floods
The Richmond Mall car park was rapidly filled with rising flood water.
Nelson floods
Flooding on Petherbridge St in Motueka.
Nelson floods
Torrents of water flow down Queen St past the Night n Day dairy
Nelson floods
Nicole Arundel is submerged up to her waist in Kingston St, Motueka.
richmond floods
Adrian's Barber Shop owner Adrian Bradley flushes water from last night's deluge out of his Queen St store in Richmond.
richmond floods
Jeff McLaren surveys the damage in his house on the corner of Park Dr and Champion Rd, badly affected by flooding last night.
richmond floods
Contractors work to repair damage caused to the surface of Main Rd Stoke.
richmond floods
Flood water pools in the interior of the Saxton Stadium in Stoke.
richmond floods
Park Dr covered with mud from Sunday's deluge.
richmond floods
Huge cracks and potholes on Main Rd Stoke.
richmond floods
Woolmart manager Gwenda Roberts sweeps silt and rubbish off the soaked carpet of her Queen St store.
richmond floods
Heavy rainfall last night left standing water in an empty building on the corner of Queen St and Gladstone Rd.
richmond floods
Stoke residents Trudi and Tony Vreugdenhil commence the cleanup following the flooding on Sunday night.
richmond floods
Saxton Road resident Brian Fensom indicates where the flood waters rose to during the flooding on Sunday night.
richmond floods
An abandoned car on Main Road, Stoke.
richmond floods
Saxton Road resident Andrea Fensom in her water logged kitchen following the flooding on Sunday night.

When staff arrived at Sport Tasman’s Sport House yesterday morning they likened the scene to a bomb site, while damage to the Saxton Stadium’s ‘‘primary asset’’, the $500,000 stadium floor, is still being assessed.

The entire Saxton Stadium facility is closed until further notice after a flooding force severe enough to crack plaster board left the expanse of the 3800 sqm floor area underwater and covered in a 5mm thick layer of mud and silt yesterday.

In the adjoining Sports House, the administration hub for Sport Tasman and a number of other codes including Nelson Netball and Nelson Bays Football, the surface flooding was compounded by an apparent fault with the guttering system. The water entered the ceiling space causing them to collapse, mainly along the north facing side of the building.

Saxton Stadium flood
TEAM EFFORT: Sport Tasman's facilities manager Brent Maru and contractor Alex Dufeu during the clean up at Saxton Stadium yesterday.

The deluge set new rainfall records for the Tasman district, with 99.5mm of rain falling in the Orphanage Creek area in an hour on Sunday evening. Orphanage Creek runs along the front entrance to the Saxton Field complex.

‘‘We opened up sport house and it was like a bomb zone,’’ said Brent Maru, Sport Tasman’s facilities manager. ‘‘With the ceilings collapsed and the wet pinex board on the carpet and water everywhere, the offices are uninhabitable.’’

The power was out in the facility and it is possible Sports House may need to be rewired. The phone and email systems are down and much of the furniture and electronic equipment was damaged. The total cost of repair is as yet unknown but it is expected to be more than $200,000.

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Sport Tasman hoped to be operational by this afternoon or Wednesday. As soon as cabling and IT can be connected, they will work out of the top floor of the netball pavilion.

During the 2011 December floods, there was a small amount of leakage on the southern side of Sports House, but that issue had been fixed and appeared unrelated to the issues that saw most of the ceiling along the northern length collapse.

‘‘It looks like the gutters were backlogged so water has come in and the ceiling tiles have fallen in,’’ said Mr Maru.

‘‘From the leftover mud it looks like we have probably had an inch of water through all of the ground floor of Saxton Stadium and Sports House. Now the concern turns to the prime asset of the facility which is the floor.’’

One of the first phone calls made was to Hardwood Technology, the Auckland based company that installed the floor, with staff taking expert advice to try and limit the damage.

Nelson City Council contractors were working to get rid of the remaining grit and water yesterday and were cleaning the floor with commercial equipment.

Mr Maru said they would be expecting insurance assessors and floor experts in to help gauge the extent of the damage.

‘‘Worst case scenario it will be an insurance claim and it will need replacing, but it is just too early to know.’’
Fatefully the type of floor is known as a ‘‘floating floor’’ with a concrete base, baffles and then the hardwood.

Inbuilt, small removable hole sections within the floor revealed a thick layer of mud and debris beneath the wood. There also appeared to be some warping on the surface itself with individual planks now easily distinguishable where it had previously not been the case.

Mark Slane, a company director at Hardwood Technology said the design of the floor would actually help to reduce the flood damage.

‘‘When you do get the extremes of a flood, the floor has the ability to move on its own. In theory it has the ability to expand and contract,’’ said Mr Slane.

‘‘We have had other flooded systems, not to the same extent, that have recovered.’’

The system’s ability to right itself depended on the severity of the flooding damage. Mr Slane said if the grain itself was badly affected by the moisture, it would not return to its original condition.

‘‘We don’t quite know the extent of the work needed down there. The floor itself is about half a million dollars to replace, that covers installation. You would also have to get it out of course so there would be a bit of work in that,’’ he said.

Saxton Stadium was opened in 2009. The $12 million facility was funded primarily by Nelson City Council with a significant contribution by Tasman District Council and a number of other grants.

What you need to know

Information for Sport Tasman community programme stakeholders