Jesus brain scan a 'miracle'

A scan of Jennifer Lougee Mingramm's brain following emergency surgery to treat a stroke.
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A scan of Jennifer Lougee Mingramm's brain following emergency surgery to treat a stroke.

A former Blenheim man says there are signs of divine intervention in a scan of his wife's brain after she had emergency surgery following a stroke. 

When Tamaha MacDonald and his wife Jennifer Lougee Mingramm returned home from the hospital after Lougee Mingramm suffered a stroke, they started looking through a pile of X-rays taken during her treatment. 

The pair, who live in Mexico City, spotted an unusual image in an X-ray of Lougee Mingramm's brain. 

Jennifer Lougee Mingramm with her husband, former Blenheim man, Tamaha MacDonald.
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Jennifer Lougee Mingramm with her husband, former Blenheim man, Tamaha MacDonald.

"We were both convinced we could see a face," MacDonald said.

Although their doctor did not spot the resemblance, MacDonald, Lougee Mingramm and her family were convinced that an image at the centre of the scan depicted Jesus Christ.

The pyschological phenomenon of recognising a familiar pattern within an image or object is called pareidolia. 

Past cases of pareidolia include people spotting an image of Jesus on a clothes iron and a piece of pita bread, while the Virgin Mary has made an appearance on a pebble

Lougee Mingramm has kept the X-ray at her side since she discovered it, and the scan was known in the family as "Jen's Jesus".

It gave the couple hope going forward, MacDonald said.

"The image represents a miracle." 

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Lougee Mingramm suffered from a rare lung condition, alpha 1 antitrypsin deficiency, that could produce emphysema in the lungs, cirrhosis of the liver, and affect the heart.

She was given a 20 per cent chance of surviving the surgery after her stroke in 2013, which happened after she was given steroids to keep her lungs open. 

The pair met in Sydney before marrying in Blenheim in 2010. They then travelled to Mexico where the pair settled.

Lougee Mingramm's medical condition meant she needed an oxygen machine 24 hours a day. If she left the house, she took a mobile oxygen tank with her. 

She could not be left alone and MacDonald had given up work to care for her. 

MacDonald has set up a page on fundraising website Give A Little to go towards the cost of his wife's double lung transplant.  

READ MORE: Double lung transplant gives hope

MacDonald said the cost of a double lung transplant and the first 12 months of medical care was "north of $1 million [US]" without insurance. 

Specialist doctors who assessed Lougee Mingramm in Mexico recommended she travel to the United States for further evaluation and treatment, MacDonald said.

 - The Marlborough Express

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