Nuclear physics paper written by iOS autocomplete

Associate professor Christoph Bartneck has studied flags but is no expert in nuclear physics.
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Associate professor Christoph Bartneck has studied flags but is no expert in nuclear physics.

An academic's use of his iOS autocomplete function has gained him a place at a scientific conference, which he knows nothing about.

University of Canterbury Human Interface Technology laboratory associate professor Christoph Bartneck does not claim to be an expert in nuclear physics.

Despite this, he was invited via email to submit a paper to the International Conference on Atomic and Nuclear Physics in the US in November. 

Christoph Bartneck said his paper really did not make sense.
DAVID HALLETT

Christoph Bartneck said his paper really did not make sense.

​Bartneck – known for his research into children's toys such as Lego – decided to take the invitation, which was assumed to be spam, as far as he could using his phone.

"Since I have practically no knowledge of nuclear physics I resorted to iOS auto-complete function to help me writing the paper."

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By typing words such as 'nuclear' and 'atomic' and then randomly hitting auto-complete suggestions on his phone, an ...
123rf.com

By typing words such as 'nuclear' and 'atomic' and then randomly hitting auto-complete suggestions on his phone, an academic has written an absurd paper.

Under a fake identity, Iris Pear, Bartneck wrote his ​iOS generated paper for the international conference.

He typed in words such as 'nuclear' and 'atomic' and by randomly hitting auto-complete suggestions, let the phone do the rest.

"Repeat this as often as often as you want and you get a paper that can even be accepted at a scientific conference," Bartneck said, in a Youtube tutorial on how to achieve the absurd outcome.

And "Good luck."

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"The text really does not make any sense," Bartneck wrote in a blog post on Thursday.

"After adding the first illustration on nuclear physics from Wikipedia, some references and creating a fake identity (Iris Pear, aka Siri Apple) I submitted the paper which was accepted only three hours later.

I know that iOS is a pretty good software, but reaching tenure has never been this close."

His fictitious author, Iris Pear "completed his PhD at the age of 29 years from IRS University of Technology. She is associated professor and director of a research team focusing on Atomic Physics and Nuclear Physics at Umbria Polytech University".

Entitled Atomic Energy will have been made available to a single source, the paper featured such lines as "power is not a great place for a good time".

"Physics are great but at the same time as you have been able and the same way to get the rest to your parents."

Bartneck, was asked confirm his slot for the "oral presentation" and register for the event at a cost of US$1099.

Bartneck told Guardian Australia that he did not complete this step because his university would "certainly object to me wasting money this way".

"My impression is that this is not a particularly good conference."

One commentator on Bartneck's blog suggested the invitation was spam.

 - Stuff

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