'Business as usual' at vineyard despite Mainzeal

Last updated 05:00 13/02/2013

Relevant offers

National business

Budget Buster: Eight tips for getting cheap rental cars Is Cadbury's in-house 'Cocoa Life' the same as Fairtrade? Single mum battles with mental illness and starts booming make up business Social impact bonds will one day be in your KiwiSaver Christchurch's terraced homes struggling to sell as housing market levels Cruise ship passenger levy of $5 proposed to help build Akaroa Health Hub Christchurch Adventure Park lays off staff on fixed-term contracts after Port Hills fires Million-dollar real estate agent claims losing his Aston Martin would cause 'extreme hardship' Farmer gets frank in job advert for stock man: 'Can be a smoker - but won't have the time' Bells Island Wastewater Treatment Plant provides 'fascinating' workplace

It is business as usual for the Waiheke Island winery caught up in the Mainzeal receivership issue.

Richina Pacific bought Te Motu Vineyard from the Dunleavy family and shareholders in 2011. Richina also bought the property formerly known as Isola Estate.

Richina is the parent company of Mainzeal Property and Construction, which went into receivership on Waitangi Day.

Chef Bronwen Laight says that last Thursday morning she and her fellow workers were told to carry on as normal at The Shed restaurant at Te Motu Vineyard.

Winemaker John Dunleavy says it's "business as usual".

"We've been told we shouldn't be affected. The Shed is still open and the vineyard is operating as usual.

"We have been out putting nets on the vines."

Ad Feedback

- BusinessDay.co.nz

Special offers

Featured Promotions

Sponsored Content