Loyalty schemes matter more than service

RICHARD MEADOWS
Last updated 10:01 18/02/2013
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BARGAIN HUNTERS: More than four in 10 people would return to a store where the service had dropped as long as it had a good loyalty scheme.

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Kiwis will go out of their way to visit stores with loyalty schemes, with many even foregoing good service in search of a bargain, a survey has found.

Women were particularly keen to bag a bargain with 73 per cent saying they would do so, compared to just over half of males.

An online survey commissioned by food service franchise Muffin Break found two thirds of respondents would travel further to visit a store with a loyalty programme.

The survey also found that more than four in 10 people would return to a store where the service had dropped as long as it had a good loyalty scheme.

When asked to describe how important store loyalty programmes were to them, 45 per cent said they used loyalty cards wherever possible.

Forty per cent said they used their loyalty card when they remembered or were reminded in store, and just 15 per cent said they only occasionally or rarely used a loyalty scheme.

Older shoppers were much more likely to be dedicated users of loyalty cards, but they were also much less willing to accept poor service.

Muffin Break released the research to promote the launch of its own loyalty programme.

PR man Mark Devlin said while loyalty schemes had become an integral part of the kiwi shopping psyche, it was important they did not become a substitute for good service.

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- BusinessDay.co.nz

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