City music teacher gains honorary membership

Last updated 05:00 11/07/2014

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Visiting music examiner Matthews Tyson says competitions might seem to be waning but performance challenges for musicians are growing.

And to encourage this, the St Cecilia School of Music, which he represents, is donating prizemoney for entrants in the Southland competitions.

There's $100 for a first placing and $50 for second, over piano, instrumental and vocal sections, performances from St Cecilia's curriculum, which has been taught here since the year 2000.

It is Tyson's 40th visit to Southland, where he examines three times a year, and he says the growth of interest in performance challenges is of note - here as elsewhere.

St Cecilia, founded 40 years ago in Launceston, Tasmania, is taught widely now.

"It is a good look having young people come through, looking to train as examiners."

St Cecilia has made its first Southland teacher, Marilyn O'Grady, an honorary member of its college of music, one of just five New Zealanders honoured at its 40th celebrations.

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- The Southland Times


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