Sad end for hardy horse and shepherd

ABOUT THE SOUTH

LLOYD ESLER
Last updated 11:38 26/08/2014
Southland Times photo
Titus Oates tends to the ponies aboard the Terra Nova.

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In the South

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In 1912 one of the shepherds on Glenaray Station disappeared in a snowstorm and his remains were found four years later.

His horse was never found despite it being probably the hardiest horse in the country. It was a Manchurian pony, one of the spares from Scott's Antarctic Expedition.

The ponies had been broken in on Quarantine Island in Lyttelton Harbour in 1910 and the best 19 were selected for the voyage.

The surplus ones were sold.

Dogs proved much more suitable for the task of sled-pulling and they could be fed on seal meat whereas the ponies needed hay. None survived to return to New Zealand. The picture by Herbert Ponting shows Titus Oates tending to the ponies aboard the Terra Nova.

A number of the world's placenames are acronyms - Soweto and Pakistan are examples.

There is at least one Southland example. Mihj Peak in the Darran Mountains in Fiordland is named from the initials of the first ascendants, the late Gerry Hall-Jones and Malcolm Imlay. They were very surprised to see that one get gazetted!

Are there any other Southland examples?

White Hill Wind Farm is the province's first large-scale producer of electricity from wind power. Meridian Energy's project was announced in 2004 and completed in 2007.

The farm has 29 two-megawatt turbines and can produce enough electricity to supply about 30,000 average households. The blades are 39m long, the nacelle sits at 67m and the total height to the bladetips is 107m.

Southland's coolest vertebrate is the brown tree frog, the only known southern hemisphere vertebrate that can survive being frozen solid then thawed.

Other cold-blooded vertebrates, such as Antarctic fish, tolerate sea temperatures well below freezing point but they don't get frozen solid.

Southland's largest clock is in Wachner Place in Invercargill. It was originally housed in the old clock tower built in 1894.

The tower was demolished in 1943 and the current one built in 1989.

After the demolition H&J Smith filled the chronometrical void and erected their clock tower.

About The South
Lloyd Esler 
15 Mahuri Rd, 
Otatara, RD 9, 
Invercargill 
Phone-fax (03) 213 0404 
email: esler@southnet.co.nz

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- The Southland Times

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