Early end for dredge

ABOUT THE SOUTH

LLOYD ESLER
Last updated 11:17 20/06/2014
Dredge

This old diesel-powered gold dredge operated from June 1935 until November 1937.

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Southland's best- preserved gold dredge is still on its original site, on sand flats behind Waipapa Beach. It had been operated by the Waipapa Beach Gold Dredging Company from June 1935 until November 1937.

The diesel- powered dredge floated on a pontoon and could reach 5.2 metres below the surface and process 30 cubic metres an hour.

A total of 81.5 kilograms of gold was recovered but shifting sand and mechanical failures led to the end of the project.

Southland's most named place is probably Bluff Hill or Motupohue which has been called The Mount, The Bluff, Old Man's Bluff, Cape Bernadin and Cape Barradine. The summit is the highest point in Invercargill City - 265 metres.

Southland's first postmistress was Magdalena Orchiston who took on the job at Waikaia in June 1889. She was the second woman in New Zealand to hold such a position. She was also Registrar of Births, Deaths and Marriages, empowered to solemnise marriages, and is said to have been the first woman in the British Dominions to hold this position.

She was involved in temperance, music and school committees and the Otago Witness said: "The obliging qualities of this official and her strict adherence to duty have rendered her popularity unlimited."

Southland's longest work stoppage was at the Linton mine from August 19, 1932, to March 15, 1933. About 300 men were involved in the 151-day 1951 waterfront dispute at Bluff.

Southland's most unwelcome butterfly is the Cabbage white butterfly which was accidentally introduced to New Zealand in 1930. It reached Southland at the end of 1937. A new butterfly, the Large white, is established in Nelson and may reach Southland where it could become a major pest.

About The South
Lloyd Esler 
15 Mahuri Rd, 
Otatara, RD 9, 
Invercargill 
Phone-fax (03) 213 0404 
email: esler@southnet.co.nz

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- The Southland Times

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