Feel the Fomo and do it anyway

Last updated 10:03 10/04/2014
Pat Veltkamp Smith
JOHN HAWKINS/Fairfax NZ
Columnist Pat Veltkamp Smith was Southland Times women's editor until 1997 and is a former president of the Southland Justices of the Peace Association.

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OPINION: Look, have you noticed how widespread it is, the latest social disease, Fomo?

That fear of missing out - Fomo - is affecting not only the adherents but everyone within an ever widening circle.

So, thanks for stopping by to read this, and please, just keep on keeping on.

Just don't suddenly think of turning over to see if there's something on the other side.

Well there is something, but it is not of necessity better, yet it's knowing something, something else, is there that can drive us crazy and we have to flick over to see what it is.

And if you have done just that, serve you right if you struck the Lorneville stock sale so that when you have finished the fat lamb section you'll flick back to me?

Thanks.

You may well have learned something but chances are in that restless reading you'll forget it.

See most of us find ourselves caught in the fear of missing out syndrome.

We can feel guilt - or maybe not - of worrying that we are missing out on specials miles away either in the sense of travelling kilometres or in Trade Me or Ebay watching the hours.

We might miss out if we don't check the site now, when we meant to read to the kids, or pack the dishwasher or return someone's phone call.

Some days there are so many things happening, petrol down a cent, sales on till midnight, flu jabs on offer and so many telly programmes to see, record, rewind.

It's like sitting next to the hand that holds the clicker.

He doesn't dislike what he's watching - how could he, having chosen it and every preceding programme during the past hour - but he knows that there is something else, something other and that's enough.

See, he just knows that on other channels there are other programmes and any one of them - well, he's just go to see it.

Why?

Like they say of conquering a mountain - just because it is there.

Today people may be talking to you but texting, filming, further field.

A dear friend, visiting, maintained a good conversation with us while filming her surroundings and texted her brother in Australia sending the pics while he, a disc jockey, played a request for us.

Buseeey.

 

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