Classic tale faithful to its source

REVIEWED BY SHAUN YEO
Last updated 08:04 16/07/2013
Lone Ranger

BACK IN THE SADDLE: Johnny Depp, left, as Tonto with Armie Hammer as the Lone Ranger.

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OPINION: MOVIE REVIEW: The Lone Ranger. Starring Johnny Depp, Armie Hammer, William Fichtner. Directed by Gore Verbinski

Wow, what a difference a week can make. In the past fortnight I've been to see two of my childhood heroes return to the big screen. Superman was a tad disappointing, so it was with much apprehension that I sat down to watch The Lone Ranger.

How gritty and dark were the film-makers going to make the masked man? How far would they travel from the source material? Thankfully, not too far.

It's all there: Tonto, silver bullets and, thankfully, the wonderful William Tell Overture.

Ah, movie bliss. Like they say, don't mess with the classics.

A posse of Texas Rangers ride out to track down the Cavendish gang and are ambushed. Only one, John Reid (Armie Hammer), survives and with the guidance of a Native American warrior named Tonto (Johnny Depp), he dons a mask to become the Lone Ranger.

Be warned, this is not Sergio Leone or Clint Eastwood, it's the Lone Ranger and, if you're not acquainted with the character, you may not enjoy it as much as those who are. A certain level of nostalgia is required to enjoy this film, but if you're not familiar, there is still a lot to like.

It's shot beautifully - there is great cinematography helped by the stunning scenery.

The chemistry between the two leads is enjoyable, with the banter reminiscent of Jude Law and Robert Downey Jr in the recent Sherlock Holmes films.

There is hardly any computer- generated imagery. It's real action with real stunts. All in all, it's a classic family-friendly western.

However, some of the scenes are slightly jarring in their placement and it is too long, slowing in the middle, but then a shot rings out, the crowd turns and a masked rider appears astride a white horse and the stirring overture begins. I could not stop grinning. The ending is worth the price of admission alone. Hi-Yo, Silver!

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- The Southland Times

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