'Fords burn better than Holdens'

19:53, Nov 25 2013
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Riverlands School Truck and Trade Show
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Riverlands School Truck and Trade Show
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Riverlands School Truck and Trade Show
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Riverlands School Truck and Trade Show
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Riverlands School Truck and Trade Show
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Robert Graham with his Scania 580 horsepower, heavy log series 580, 932,000km truck. Gordon Berry, Hana Berry, 8, and Theresa Berry.
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3-year-old Oscar Duncan
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Daniel Ham has been helping Mike Gifford with his Log Trucks
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Riverlands School Truck and Trade Show
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Daniel Jones, 12, from Renwick stands under a brand new 32 tonne Cat Digger, the first of it's type in New Zealand. The digger is owned by Gill Construction Co Ltd.
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Tamati Matene, Caine Ivanow and Ben Conroy.
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Sean Jones (Blobby) with his nieces Zeffi Lewis, 6, and Prea Lewis, 4. Sean drives for Gill Construction. His truck is a V8 Mercedez Benz Actros.
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Riverlands Truck and Trade Show
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Goodbye Ford
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The bonnet and roof of the Holden fly into the air
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Holden v Ford
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Ricky Wilson
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Ricky Wilson
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Max Campbell, 2, on the digger
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Scott Radovanovich Classic Hits
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Small children and big trucks came together at a school fundraiser near Blenheim.

Forty-seven trucks and about 4000 people gathered at Riverlands Roadhouse on State Highway 1 south of Blenheim for the Truck and Trade Show, a fundraiser for Riverlands School.

The blowing up of a Ford and a Holden car was a highlight of the programme. Members of the public bid for the rights to press the button and detonate the cars packed with explosives

"Tricky" Knight of Ascguard Vehicle Services who supplied the cars said, "we try to do something extreme".

His daughter Jessica Shewan, 11, said after the explosion, "Fords burn better than Holdens."

Fundraising chairman Grant Ingersoll of Master Driver Services Ltd said the day was not just about raising money but also promoting safety around trucks.

The main message was that trucks were big compared with people, took a long time to come to a stop, were hard to see around and truck drivers could not always see cars behind them, Ingersoll said.

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