Submerged car drives in froth

Last updated 19:06 28/01/2013
Fairfax Australia

A car stuns police and onlookers on the Sunshine Coast, almost running down two police officers after driving while completely submerged by a blanket of froth.

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The wild weather on Queensland’s southeast coast has whipped up more than the swell, with layers of ocean foam blanketing some roads and parks on the Gold and Sunshine coasts.

Gold Coast holiday-maker Lionel Armitstead said the white froth had come up the foreshore at Burleigh Heads and was covering pedestrian paths and picnic areas.

In some places the suds are up to one metre high.

‘‘It’s like a snowstorm,’’ he said.

‘‘The kids are up to their shoulders basically... I’ve never seen anything like it.’’

Currumbin resident Mike Thies said the suds had been whipped up by ‘‘huge’’ surf overnight and had blanketed the beach near his house in a thick layer spreading about 15 metres from the beach towards the road.

Thies said he’d seen similar scenes after a wild storm several years ago.

Extraordinary video footage showed a car emerging from beneath a thick blanket of foam, startling traffic police who are forced to leap from its path.

The footage was posted on YouTube and police have confirmed it was filmed on the Sunshine Coast.

The coastal froth was formed during storms when powerful waves force air into the water and produce foam, according to the Griffith University Centre for Coastal Management.

The Sunshine and Gold coasts had been pummelled by the low pressure system that was tropical cyclone Oswald in recent days, with six-metre swells reported in some areas.

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- AAP

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