Dr Libby to tackle psychology of eating

GWYNETH HYNDMAN
Last updated 05:00 08/10/2012
Libby Weaver
SUPPLIED
MORE VEGES: Dr Libby Weaver is coming to Palmerston North to demystify healthy eating.

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Stressed, tired and prone to inhaling a packet of biscuits out of loneliness is how Dr Libby Weaver describes many eaters today.

The Australian-born superstar of health and nutrition - who is known as "Dr Libby" - is on a New Zealand tour to demystify the relationship between food, bodies and minds which she said is probably overwhelming for anyone who walked into a bookshop in pursuit of a healthier lifestyle.

She will host a seminar on the subject in Invercargill on October 19.

Most people knew when they were munching destructively, but change was not about going crazy and emptying the pantry of sugar and carbohydrates, which was often how people attacked a nutrition overhaul, she said.

Her role was to "bridge the gap" between getting nutrients that fuelled the body and the psychology that drove poor eating habits.

"I help people answer the question ‘Why do you do what you do when you know what you know?' It's helping them to break through a lot of myths about eating to lose weight, avoiding carbohydrates, dieting . . .

"I'm changing the focus from weight loss to healthy eating."

Some of this starts with her asking them to finish the sentence "food is . . ."

For some it was fuel, for others it might be pleasure, she said.

She encouraged people to eat what she called "low human intervention food" which could impact on mood swings, sleeping patterns and stress levels, she said.

It may not be a new idea, but her combination of dietary recommendations and psychology had flipped a switch for many people who used food to mask deeper issues.

"It's quite subconscious, often people eat because they are lonely, sad, and convinced that no-one loves them.

"My biggest joy is seeing that light go on."

The seminar coincides with her new book Dr Libby's Real Food Chef which follows Accidentally Overweight - which sold 30,000 copies - and Rushing Woman's Syndrome.

Dr Libby said the tour included Invercargill, after getting some "very gorgeous" emails wondering why she didn't include the city on her last national tour.

"It has been incredible to see and hear so many people who are keen and ready to better nourish and look after their bodies."

The Invercargill seminar will be held at the Kelvin Hotel from 12.30pm.

Tickets are $29.95 online; door sales are $35.

Tickets can be bought at the Dr Libby website.

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