Invercargill bus driver wins award

Invercargill bus driver, Anoop Kumar, who took home the award for ???Top Theory??? at Go Bus Transport???s Bus Roadeo in ...
JOANNA GRIFFITHS/FAIRFAX NZ

Invercargill bus driver, Anoop Kumar, who took home the award for ???Top Theory??? at Go Bus Transport???s Bus Roadeo in Christchurch on Saturday, March 11.

Can you recite New Zealand road code of by heart? Anoop Kumar can. 

The Invercargill Go Bus driver was awarded the Top Theory Test Result at the Go Bus Transport's Bus Roadeo in Christchurch on March 11.

Kumar, who has worked as a bus driver in Invercargill for 11 years got 100 per cent in a 40 question theoretical written exam that tested his knowledge on road codes. 

Eleven finalists were selected from a nationwide pool of 2200 employees to participate in the competition that tested the four different disciplines of bus driving; theory, vehicle inspection, customer service and driving skills.

He was shocked when he found out he had been selected as a finalist. 

"I just grabbed an application form from the smoko-room, filled it in and gave it to my supervisor. I didn't think about it too much."

Everyone in the office was so excited about his award, "people are getting ready to apply for next time."

Driving a bus was one of the best jobs in the country, he said. 

He got to spend his days talking to people and driving on New Zealand's scenic roads, "it's great."

"I love driving to Queenstown, its is so beautiful."

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Although there were times when passengers were disorderly or drivers were impatient on the road, there was no such thing as a bad day, he said. 

"It's all just part of the job and most of the time people are nice.

"The best thing is when you drive people around and they give you good feedback or say thank you."

Kumar originally learnt to drive in Fiji.

"I moved to Invercargill for the job." 

The transition was fairly easy, he said. 

Most of the road rules were the same, the only real difference was the bus windows.

Because of the heat in Fiji buses had no glass in their window, just a space were the glass should be and canvas covers for when it rained, he said. 

"It sounds strange but it works, it is very pleasant." 

Weather conditions were almost the opposite in Invercargill with no shortage of rainy days or gail force winds leading him to find a new appreciation of the humble window. 

"No, glass wouldn't work here."

 

 - Stuff

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