Hospice shop wares undergo a makeover

Winton Hospice Shop recycling competition winner Toby King, of Waianiwa School, hold his concrete teddy bear, surrounded ...
MARY WITSEY/FAIRFAX NZ

Winton Hospice Shop recycling competition winner Toby King, of Waianiwa School, hold his concrete teddy bear, surrounded by Winton Primary School students.

Recycling was the focus at the Winton Hospice Shop recently, during an event aimed at encouraging people to transform old into new.

The event was the brainchild of shop manager Maree Ronald, and almost fifty adults and children fossicked amongst the shop's treasures to find items they could take home and transform.

Including a re-covered chair, a photo frame given a colourful new life, and a handbag made of old ties, the creations were many and varied and Ronald said they showed just what people could do.

"It's been amazing. Even though people might not use an item, it can be up-cycled."

She was delighted at the interest and enthusiasm shown by locals and said the event had achieved her goal.

"First and foremost, it was a competition aimed at involving the community.

"It wasn't so much about fundraising but about encouraging people who might not normally come into a second-hand store to visit us and see the quality products that we've got here.

"And I think we've got a few converts."

Great community support had made the competition even more successful, she said, with some students from Winton Primary School pairing up and recycling an item as a class activity.

"The kids have learned about hospice and what we do, how we raise money and where it goes to support Southland people."

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Primary school section winner Toby King of Waianiwa School, used an old teddy bear to create a unique garden ornament.

"My mum gave me the idea. It took me five days and I put two layers of concrete over the bear.

"I made it so it could be a statue and it will go in the garden at home."

And he was thrilled with his success.

"I feel excited, though I did think I could win."

He had learned a lot through the hospice competition, he said. 

"It's recycling – even though people don't want things anymore, others can put them to use."

MoreFM's breakfast team judged the competition, with Cassandra Rodger-Foran winning the secondary schools' section and Nancy Findlay taking out the adults'.

 - Stuff

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