Westboro Baptist Church founder dies

Last updated 08:15 21/03/2014

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The Reverend Fred Phelps Sr, the fiery founder of a small Kansas church who led outrageous and hate-filled protests that blamed almost everything, including the deaths of AIDS victims and US soldiers, on America's tolerance for gay people, has died. He was 84.

Daughter Margie Phelps said Phelps, whose actions drew international condemnation, died around midnight on Wednesday (local time). She didn't provide the cause of death or the condition that recently put him in hospice care.

Throughout his life, Phelps and the Westboro Baptist Church, a small congregation made up almost entirely of his extended family, tested the boundaries of free speech, violating accepted societal standards for decency in their unapologetic assault on gays and lesbians. In the process, some believe he even helped the cause of gay rights by serving as such a provocative symbol of intolerance.

Phelps believed any misfortune, most infamously the deaths of American soldiers killed in Iraq and Afghanistan, was God's punishment for society's tolerance of homosexuality.

He and his followers carried forward their message bluntly, holding signs at funerals and public events that used ugly slurs and read "Thank God for dead soldiers." God, he preached, had nothing but anger and bile for the moral miscreants of his creation.

His church recently said it would protest at Kiwi singer Lorde's upcoming Kansas City concert.

"New Zealand came forth with a young lassie that doesn't have enough sense to put in a thimble," his church said in a statement.

Lorde replied by calling on fans to wear rainbow colours to the concert and welcome the church members by kissing them:

"hahaha omg just found out westboro baptist church are going to picket my show in kansas city," she tweeted. "Everyone wear rainbow clothing to that show ... [and] try to kiss church members who are same sex as you. They will so love it. Christmas comin early in kansas city."

Phelps asked "can you preach the Bible without preaching the hatred of God?" in a 2006 interview with The Associated Press. "The answer is absolutely not. And these preachers that muddle that and use that deliberately, ambiguously to prey on the follies and the fallacious notions of their people, that's a great sin."

For those who didn't like the message or the tactics, Phelps and his family had only disdain. "They need to drink a frosty mug of shut-the-hell-up and avert their eyes," his daughter, Shirley Phelps-Roper, once told a group of Kansas lawmakers.

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The activities of Phelps' church, unaffiliated with any larger denomination, inspired a federal law and laws in more than 40 states limiting protests and picketing at funerals. He and a daughter were even barred from entering Britain for inciting hatred.

But in a major free-speech ruling in 2011, the US Supreme Court held that the church and its members were protected by the US Constitution's First Amendment and could not be sued for monetary damages for inflicting pain on grieving families.

Yet despite that legal victory, some gay rights advocates believe all the attention Phelps generated served to advance their cause.

- AP

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