Rummager revels in heritage festival

23:06, Mar 23 2014
Lachlan Dixon
Lachlan Dixon, 7, of Wreys Bush with the giant bubbles.
Riverton Heritage Harvest Festival
Riverton Heritage harvest festival held at Aparima College during the weekend.
Adrian Buddle
Adrian and Renee Buddle, both of Invercargill, at the heritage festival.
Robyn Guyton
Robyn and Hollie Guyton, both of Riverton, enjoying their cafe lunch at the festival.
Hazel Clemens
Hazel Clemens, left, of Invercargill, her grandmother Jan Clemens, of Pleasant Point, and Donnette Wohlers looking at Donnette's driftwood decoarations.

A Riverton woman who makes "wheat dudes" and driftwood decorations can not imagine her life without growing, fossicking and harvesting.

Donnette Wohlers was running one of the many stalls lining the Aparima College hall at the weekend selling products during the sixth Riverton Heritage Harvest Festival.

The festival celebrated the fruits and labours of the traditional annual harvest.

Southland Times photo
Hazel Clemens, left, of Invercargill, her grandmother Jan Clemens, of Pleasant Point, and Donnette Wohlers looking at Donnette's driftwood decoarations.

People seemed to be drawn to Ms Wohler's colourful stall complete with herbs, dried flowers, strawberry plants and potpourri.

She had been running a stall at the festival for three or four years, she said.

Ms Wohlers, a gardener, has been growing mainly vegetables and herbs for several years and used her green-fingered efforts to create other items, she said.

Advertisement

"I couldn't imagine life without it . . . growing, fossicking, harvesting and what can come from that. It's just part of who I am. It keeps me sane."

Her creations include driftwood decorations and "wheat dudes" made out of harvested wheat.

The popular driftwood decorations were held together by copper wire or other wire and were pieces of driftwood collected from the beach at Riverton.

Festival co-ordinator Robyn Guyton said the two-day event had attracted more than 1000 people with some coming from as far as Dunedin and Wanaka.

The festival included vegetable animals, information displays, home baking, a cider press, heritage potatoes and apples.

Every year there were more entries and more stall holders, she said. 

 

The Southland Times