Web series wizards hand out screen tips

Networks 'crying out for new voices'

Last updated 13:54 13/06/2014
Future Web Wizards
JOHN HAWKINS/ FAIRFAX NZ

FUTURE WEB WIZARDS: SIT screenwriting students, from left, Arjun Sethu, Shanon Smith and Matt Van Dorrestein, ahead of a free web series workshop on Sunday run by the creators of successful series "Auckland Daze".

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Aspiring film-makers can skip the mainstream and still get an audience with a web series - and Script to Screen want to show you how.

Successful web series Auckland Daze creators and actors Kiel McNaughton and Kerry Warkia are presenting a free workshop on the format at SIT on Sunday.

A web series is an episodic drama or documentary - like a TV series, but only available online through TV on Demand, YouTube, Vimeo, the Web Series Channel, or a dedicated website.

Workshop co-ordinator Eloise Veber said web series were usually shows with characters and themes that may never get mainstream TV funding because they are too niche.

But taking the online route means film-makers can bypass those concerns, as a web series can be anything from self-funded to high budget, with episode lengths from two minutes to 100 minutes. Successful NZ web series include the NZ On Air-funded Auckland Daze and Reservoir Hill, which both screen on TVNZ Ondemand. Auckland Daze has returned for its second season as a broadcast show.

"Networks are crying out for new voices," Veber said.

This workshop is free, and open to anyone who is passionate about making film or TV, Veber said. It is suitable for beginners through to people with film-making or screenwriting experience.

Anyone can come along, provided they are over 17.

If you are interested in going to this free workshop, contact eloise@script-to-screen.co.nz.

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- The Southland Times

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