Farming turns out to be the perfect choice

LOUISE BERWICK
Last updated 05:00 12/02/2014

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Nicole Tyler was primed for a career in occupational therapy, but sitting in a lecture room was not for her.

Despite growing up on a farm and vowing never to become a farmer, Miss Taylor has done exactly that.

Lured back to the family farm because of her love of the outdoors and the animals, Miss Taylor and her partner, Brayden Kyle, are forging successful careers in the dairy industry.

But she's not letting Mr Kyle do all the work; there's milking to be done, pastures to grow, effluent to spread and calves to rear.

She does everything from managing staff to hosing down the shed.

But Miss Tyler said she never considered the career path at school and it was never promoted as a good option.

"Probably going to a girls school it wasn't put out there that much."

People thought of dairying as a "dropout business" for school leavers, but it took a lot of hard work, from knowing basic animal care to the science of growing grass, she said.

"It's a multimillion-dollar business."

Miss Tyler said she would like to see more effort put into getting young people and young girls into farming, because it was an industry with lots to offer.

"I can't imagine doing anything else."

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- The Southland Times

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