Match fixing a 'cancer on the game' - Strauss

DUNCAN JOHNSTONE
Last updated 11:14 16/05/2014
andrew strauss
GARETH COPLEY/Getty
PRAISE: Andrew Strauss.

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Former England captain Andrew Strauss has praised Lou Vincent for opening up on match-fixing and giving cricket authorities "something to work with against a cancer on the game".

Former Black Caps star Vincent is reported to be working with the International Cricket Council's (ICC) anti-corruption unit and has reportedly provided information on spot-fixing during his extensive time in cricket leagues around the world.

Vincent, now retired, played county cricket in England late in his career but was also a Twenty20 specialist in recent times, appearing in leagues in India, Africa, Bangladesh and New Zealand.

Reports of some of his revelations to the ICC emerged yesterday and gained headlines around the world.

Vincent has maintained a public silence as the investigation continues.

In England, Strauss believed Vincent was now a key figure in trying to get to the bottom of match-fixing's web, though he conceded that could be a losing battle.

"I'm pleased Lou Vincent is coming out and talking about it because that gives the authorities something to work with," Strauss told TalkSport Radio in the UK.

"They can learn how the whole thing functions and, hopefully, prevent it from happening again in the future."

Strauss was clearly shocked by the extent of allegations coming from Vincent that were reported first in Britain's Telegraph newspaper.

"It makes your heart sick," Strauss said.

"It's such a cancer on the game. You can't afford people's trust in a match to be eroded."

Strauss feared the problem was more widespread than imagined.

"It's worldwide phenomena now, though, it's not just confined to the Indian sub-continent," he said.

"The cricket authorities haven't got the manpower or resources to overcome this at the moment."

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- Fairfax Media

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