Chris Cairns to have say in ICC investigation

Last updated 05:00 26/05/2014
DAVID WHITE/Stuff.co.nz

Former New Zealand cricketer Lou Vincent was seen walking with his partner in Kaukapakapa, near Auckland.

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Lou Vincent
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AT HOME: Embattled former New Zealand cricketer Lou Vincent walks with his partner Suzie.
Chris Cairns
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'DARK FORCES': Cricketer Chris Cairns believes he's paying the price for raising concerns about the state of the game.

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While Chris Cairns is hoping to conclude this week his much-awaited interview with the British Police regarding their investigation into allegations of corruption, charged match-fixer Lou Vincent remains in New Zealand.

Vincent was seen today walking with his partner near his house in rural Kaukapakapa, just outside of Auckland.

On Friday, the England and Wales Cricket Board brought corruption and match-fixing charges against Vincent over two domestic matches.

He is also expected to be formally charged next month with fixing offences under the anti-corruption code of the Champions League Twenty20 tournament, jointly administered by the governing bodies of India, Australia and South Africa. The Cricinfo website reported the charges will relate to Vincent's appearances for the Auckland Aces at both the 2011 edition of the tournament, held in India, and the 2012 event in South Africa.

Auckland lost both of their qualifying matches in 2011 but reached the main draw the following year, with Vincent taking part in every match.

In his explosive testimony to the ACSU, leaked to media last week, Vincent mentioned Auckland's game against Hampshire in 2012 as one that was potentially ''fixed''.

Meanwhile, former New Zealand allrounder Cairns, who has strongly maintained his innocence, flew out of Auckland on Saturday for what his lawyer Aaron Lloyd said was: ''a meeting with the Met police to conclude the interview he started''.

Cairns met with British police who travelled to New Zealand in April, and said at the time his interview was cut short because they had to return to the UK.

Lloyd said Cairns was also hoping to meet with the ICC anti-corruption unit (ACSU) during his time in London this week.

In issuing strong denials of any involvement in match-fixing, Cairns also lamented he'd had no contact from the ICC.

That is largely because a police investigation takes precedence and the ASCU are waiting for that to be completed, as Cairns acknowledged last month.

ICC chief executive Dave Richardson recently offered some light at the end of the tunnel.

''We are at the end of the investigation. It is close to being finalised and I'm sure Chris Cairns will be spoken to and given an opportunity to put his side of the story,'' Richardson told Radio Sport.

''Although part of it does involve a police investigation in the UK, which I can't really vouch for as to when that will be finalised, but certainly from our perspective the investigations are close to finality and hopefully we should be making announcements pretty soon.''

Richardson also claimed that ICC investigators had discovered match-fixing was not widespread.

''I'm actually quite heartened that it's limited to these players, past players, that have retired, past historical matches, no international matches,'' he said.

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