More Black Caps players front in fixing saga

Last updated 05:00 29/05/2014

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Players' Association boss Heath Mills knows the identity of three other New Zealand internationals to testify against Chris Cairns but hopes their names remain under wraps.

The cricket world was awaiting Cairns' next move last night as he underwent his second interview with the Metropolitan Police, who are investigating match-fixing allegations against him. Cairns denies the claims.

The former New Zealand allrounder is understood to have been given full disclosure of statements from Brendon McCullum, Lou Vincent and at least three other current or former Black Caps. McCullum's and Vincent's confidential testimony was leaked to the Daily Mail, to the shock of NZ Cricket and the Players' Association.

"It's a confidential process and we would certainly hope no other statements get into the public domain," Mills said.

"It makes it really difficult for players to come forward when they can't trust the process."

Some players had approached the Players' Association for advice before coming forward to the International Cricket Council's anti-corruption unit, Mills said.

Mills hoped that the leaks were at an end, "but I've been surprised in the past".

Cairns maintained his silence yesterday, having flown to London last weekend to complete an interview he began with police in Auckland in April.

He tweeted in recent days that the investigation remained private and confidential. "When I am able to make further comment, I shall."

The Met Police investigation is separate to the ICC's anti-corruption unit's investigation, with the former taking precedence. Cairns was yet to be interviewed by the ICC but hoped to secure an audience with its anti-corruption unit this week.

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- The Dominion Post

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