Williamson reported for suspect bowling action

MARK GEENTY
Last updated 10:10 22/06/2014
Kane Williamson
Randy Brooks
TERRIFIC TON: Kane Williamson scored his seventh test century this morning in the third test against the West Indies.

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New Zealand off-spinner Kane Williamson has been reported with a suspected illegal bowling action during the second cricket test against West Indies in Port-of-Spain.

The International Cricket Council confirmed in a statement that Williamson was reported by umpires Ian Gould, Richard Illingworth and Rod Tucker, and ICC match referee Chris Broad, when the test ended yesterday.

Broad handed a copy of the report to New Zealand manager Mike Sandle.

Williamson is permitted to bowl in the third test starting in Barbados on Friday (NZT), but under the ICC process for suspect actions he has to undergo testing at Loughborough University in the UK within 21 days to determine whether he exceeds the permitted 15 degrees of flex in the elbow.

The umpires' report cited concerns over a number of deliveries that they considered to be suspect and believed that his action needed to be tested.

New Zealand coach Mike Hesson said: "I wouldn't say it was completely unexpected but we're fully supportive of it.

"Kane is certainly not the only player currently playing international cricket with a suspected illegal bowling action. There appears to be a clampdown because Kane hasn't changed the way he's bowled for at least two years. If that's the case and they want to clamp down, then all players and coaches want is a level of consistency."

Hesson said Williamson was slightly baffled but happy to comply.

"He realises he's not the only player in the world who has a suspected illegal bowling action so he's a little bit miffed because he's been doing the same thing for a couple of years. He's comfortable to go through the process."

West Indies off-spinner Shane Shillingford was reported in December and banned from bowling after he was found to have an illegal action. He underwent remedial work and was readmitted to international cricket for the current series, but is not allowed to bowl the 'doosra' which turns the other way.

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