Decision on Chris Cairns expected soon

05:36, Jul 02 2014
Chris Cairns
ON THE OFFENSIVE: Chris Cairns has strongly denied any involvement in match-fixing.

Britain's Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) will decide by September whether or not to prosecute former New Zealand allrounder Chris Cairns over match-fixing allegations, it was reported today.

Attention again shifts back to Cairns after former team-mate Lou Vincent received a life ban from the England and Wales Cricket Board yesterday and filmed a videotaped confession which began: ''My name is Lou Vincent and I am a cheat''.

In leaked testimony to anti-corruption investigators, Vincent alleged he worked for Cairns to fix matches in the now-defunct Indian Cricket League in 2008, and that Cairns tried to convince him to fix matches in England that same year.

This was backed by leaked testimony from Vincent's ex-wife, Elly Riley, which drew a sharp response from Cairns at Auckland Airport on May 30.

''The allegations he and his ex-wife make against me are despicable lies,'' said Cairns.

That was Cairns' most recent public statement, on his return from London where he completed his interview with Metropolitan Police and International Cricket Council anti-corruption investigators.

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The Telegraph reported that files from a lengthy investigation by the Met have been handed to the CPS, which will decide by September whether or not to prosecute Cairns.

Cairns, 44, has consistently denied allegations that he was involved in cricket corruption, and won a libel suit against Lalit Modi, the former commissioner of the Indian Premier League, in 2012.

He was awarded damages of £90,000 (NZ$176,000) after Modi suggested, on Twitter, that Cairns had fixed outcomes within matches in the ICL.

The ECB's successful prosecution of Vincent and Pakistani Naved Arif has not made them more eager to pursue Cairns.

Instead, The Telegraph reported, it will wait for the CPS to make its move.

The enormous expense of initiating legal proceedings, which the ECB discovered with the recent Danish Kaneria and Mervyn Westfield case (a high six-figure sum), means that the ECB is wary of taking the lead unless guilt is obvious.

In that regard, Vincent's confession and subsequent guilty plea, including an approach to former England opener Mal Loye in 2008 for Lancashire's Twenty20 game against Durham, which Loye failed to report at the time but did when approached last year, saved them a lot of money.

Cairns refused to comment when approached by Stuff today.

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