Kane Williamson relishing Twenty20 challenge

SARAH HARVEY
Last updated 05:00 04/07/2014
ane Williamson
Photosport
TOP KNOCK: Black Caps batsman Kane Williamson celebrates his century in the third test in Barbados.

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One foot in Dominica, one foot on the plane back home.

You could forgive the Black Caps if, after weeks away on tour in the West Indies, their minds were starting to wander to the routine and comforts of home.

But, despite a rare test series win on foreign soil and a new breed of confidence within this team, they still have two Twenty20 matches against a feisty West Indies side to negotiate before they can put a tick next to this tour.

On the ICC T20 rankings New Zealand in fact sits one spot above the West Indies, in sixth position, but T20 is a fickle beast and the West Indies' ability to call on players the likes of Chris Gayle means that can never be underestimated.

A change in format is always a test, too, and one which the players usually relished, batsman Kane Williamson said.

Williamson, who scored 161 not out - his highest ever test score - in the final test, said for him it was about moving out of a test match mindset and into a match where there was a large and immediate change in tempo.

Williamson will likely open with Jimmy Neesham for the two T20 matches - the first of which begins Sunday morning (NZT). The second is on Monday morning.

"It's always a challenge and one you deal with quite a bit if you are fortunate enough to be involved in the different formats but you adapt your game like you do to different conditions and different teams," Williamson said.

"A change in format obviously means an up in tempo and you're training and preparation obviously goes according to those focuses."

Williamson said the team knew home was close, but wouldn't be satisfied leaving on a losing note.

"It can be a challenge when you spend so much time away from home and you get close to leaving, but the guys are all focused on these two T20s and they want to enjoy them and it would be great to come away with some wins.

"We are always backing ourselves. We know the West Indies are one of the best teams in the world, if not the best team in the world, at this format so we know it will be a good challenge.

"The nature of T20 cricket is quite inconsistent. The fast pace that it's played at and the high risk that is involved - we know we have to play with that freedom and use the skill we have got to come out and play."

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