Pakistan batting coach Flower's 'big challenge'

Last updated 10:13 20/07/2014
Grant Flower
Reuters
LIKES TO BAT: Former Zimbabwe player Grant Flower will share his batting knowledge in his new role as Pakistan batting coach.

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Pakistan's new batting coach Grant Flower has termed his new assignment as the biggest challenge of his coaching career and is hopeful of making the batsmen more consistent.

The former Zimbabwe batsman told reporters in Lahore that he took up the assignment only because he believed he could make a difference to the Pakistan team known for their unpredictability.

''It is the biggest challenge of my coaching career coming to a different environment and working with players with a different cricketing approach. What attracted me to the job was the immense talent these players possess and how much they can improve,'' Flower said.

The younger brother of former test batsman Andy Flower, who coached England with considerable success, said his main job would be to ready the Pakistani players for the World Cup in Australia and New Zealand next year.

''These players are used to working with foreign coaches so communication will not be a problem. I just feel these players can do much more with their talent,'' he said.

Flower said some of the players threw away good starts and he wanted to change that.

''Bringing consistency and discipline to their batting is my primary task.''

The former batsman who played 67 tests and 221 one-day internationals admitted he had some apprehensions after the terror attack at the Karachi airport last month.

''They were apprehensions but (former Pakistan spinner) Mushtaq (Ahmed) spoke to Andy and myself and the Pakistan board was also in touch with me and I was comfortable coming here.''

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