Hearing finds Anderson, Jadeja 'not guilty'

Last updated 08:11 06/08/2014
James Anderson
Reuters
ENGLAND PACEMAN: James Anderson.
Ravindra Jadeja
Reuters
INDIA ALL-ROUNDER: Ravindra Jadeja.

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Indian cricket authorities have expressed their disappointment to the International Cricket Council after England fast bowler James Anderson was cleared of an alleged breach of the sport's code of conduct last month.

''We were not happy with the verdict and have expressed our displeasure in writing,'' BCCI secretary-general Sanjay Patel said.

India was expecting Anderson to be banned for up to four matches after he allegedly abused and pushed Indian player Ravindra Jadeja during the first test match in Nottingham.

But ICC judicial commissioner Gordon Lewis found both Anderson and Jadeja ''not guilty'' following a hearing by video conference which involved the players, witnesses from both teams, the team managers, legal counsel and ICC heads.

English media reported Lewis made his ruling because the witnesses gave sharply differing accounts of the clash between the two in a corridor as the players left the field and there were no independent witnesses.

Indian cricket authorities were reported to be angry that CCTV cameras in the corridor were not working at the time.

Only ICC chief executive David Richardson could appeal against the verdict and though the BCCI may not have made a direct approach, it would be hoping to persuade Richardson to overturn the verdict and punish Anderson, England's top bowler.

''The ICC has got the right to appeal so let's see what it does,'' Patel said about what he expected in response to the BCCI's letter.

The ICC was headed by India's Narainswamy Srinivasan, who was also the elected president of the BCCI but who had to step aside on a Supreme Court order pending a judicial investigation.  

Anderson and Jadeja exchanged angry words as they left the field at lunch on day two of the test at Nottingham, and it was alleged that Anderson pushed Jadeja inside the pavilion complex.

Indian captain Mahendra Singh Dhoni backed Jadeja and was reported to have escalated the matter.

Anderson was reported in England to have used obscene language aimed at Jadeja and Dhoni during play.

The ICC said in a statement overnight it would not make any comment till the time a decision was taken on whether Richardson would lodge an appeal.

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