Satisfied ICC will not appeal Anderson verdict

SUDIPTO GANGULY
Last updated 02:01 07/08/2014

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The International Cricket Council (ICC) has ruled out launching an appeal against the decision to clear England fast bowler James Anderson of a code of conduct breach, adding that it was satisfied with the judicial commissioner's verdict.

Anderson and India's Ravindra Jadeja were involved in an altercation during the first test at Trent Bridge last month but both players were found not guilty of misconduct after a six-hour video-conference hearing on Friday.

"This outcome is the result of two exhaustive and thorough disciplinary processes and, after considering the written decision, the ICC is satisfied with the manner in which the decisions have been reached," ICC chief executive Dave Richardson said in a statement.

The ICC's stance will upset the Indian cricket board (BCCI), who wrote to the governing body expressing their displeasure once Anderson was cleared to continue playing when the paceman faced a ban of up to four tests if found guilty.

The hearing of the case was held under Gordon Lewis and was also attended by the two team managers and representatives of the England and Wales Cricket Board and the BCCI.

The ICC said it believed there was no merit in an appeal and it would not be prudent to drag the matter out.

'ROBUST AND TRANSPARENT'

"It was a complicated and sensitive matter ... There appears to have been vastly conflicting evidence on both sides, with a total of 13 witnesses who gave testimony," Richardson added.

"After carefully considering the decision by Gordon Lewis, whose vast experience was invaluable to the process over recent weeks, we believe that no further purpose would be served by prolonging the process through further appeal proceedings.

"The disciplinary procedures were robust and transparent and all parties had ample opportunity to ask questions, test the evidence and make submissions.

"We have determined that there is no merit in an appeal and that it would not be in the best interest of the sport to take such action."

Richardson, however, cautioned the cricketers against the use of offensive language on the field, which, according to media reports, was personal and extensive.

"International cricket is tough, competitive and uncompromising but we must reiterate that there is no place in the game for the use of offensive language that is personally insulting of one player by another," the former South Africa wicketkeeper added.

"It is imperative that all captains, players and coaches as well as umpires and referees are reminded of and do not shirk their responsibility to one another and to the game."

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Lancashire paceman Anderson is the leading wicket-taker in the series with 16 victims and will play his home test at Old Trafford, Manchester, on Thursday. The five-match series is level at 1-1.

- Reuters

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