Allen Stanford headed to US prison hospital

ANNA DRIVER
Last updated 12:07 16/02/2011

Relevant offers

Cricket

Steve Smith helps tune up Ben Stokes' batting in the IPL ahead of the Ashes Tom Latham, Luke Ronchi selection debate to rage on after Black Caps cruise to tri-series title with big win over Ireland Mumbai Indians clinch third Indian Premier League title in final ball thriller Adam Milne returns for first ODI in 15 months as Black Caps bat first against Ireland in tri-series Scorecard: Black Caps v Ireland - ODI tri-series match five Recap: Black Caps v Ireland - ODI tri-series match five Colin de Grandhomme, Kolkata fail as Mumbai cruise into Indian Premier League final Cricket Australia reaches flashpoint over pay dispute, South Africa tour in doubt Indian Premier League 2017: Best buys and biggest flops Hamish Bennett stakes claim for future selection after impressing in Ireland

Allen Stanford, who was looking to bankroll West Indian cricket until he was accused of a $7 billion Ponzi scheme, is on the way to a prison hospital to receive treatment for addiction to anti-anxiety medication and for psychiatric evaluation.

Stanford, 60, is "in transit" from a Houston jail to another facility, according to the Federal Bureau of Prisons website's inmate locator.

US District Judge David Hittner ruled last month that Stanford was not competent to stand trial and ordered him transferred to a medical facility within the federal prison system for treatment..

At a Jan. 6 hearing to discuss the matter, the prison hospital in Butner, North Carolina was mentioned as a place where Stanford could find treatment.

Bernie Madoff, who confessed to leading the biggest financial fraud in history, is serving a 150-year prison sentence at Butner.

Stanford's lawyer, Ali Fazel, declined to comment, citing a gag order issued by Judge Hittner.

The former billionaire became addicted to a powerful anti-anxiety medicine in prison.

His lawyers also say he suffers from traumatic brain injury received after another prisoner slammed his face into a telephone, breaking a number of bones.

Stanford has pleaded not guilty to a 21-count criminal indictment that charges him with a certificates-of-deposit scam run out of his offshore bank in Antigua.

Ad Feedback

- Reuters

Special offers
Opinion poll

Should bouncers be banned from cricket?

Yes - they're too dangerous

Neutral - it is what it is

No - it's just bad luck when it goes wrong

Vote Result

Featured Promotions

Sponsored Content