New cricket rules will prove 'bad for bowlers'

Last updated 11:27 06/11/2012

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Sri Lanka captain Mahela Jayawardene said the new one-day international rule on field restrictions is disadvantageous to bowlers and could even diminish the role of spinners in the future.

Jayawardene said the International Cricket Council rule to restrict the number of outfielders to four, even outside of powerplay overs, heavily favors batsmen.

Even though he is a batsman, Jayawardene thinks the move is not in the best interests of the sport and that spinners will be especially affected.

"I am not comfortable with these changes. It's not the way to go forward," Jayawardene said Monday, a day after playing the first one-day international under the new rule. "I have this funny feeling that spinners will not have a role to play in the future."

Under the new rule there will be two set of powerplay overs and the first 10 will allow only two fielders in the outfield. The five-over batting powerplay allows three fielders in the outfield and only four fielders are allowed for the remaining overs.

The new rule came into effect in the ongoing ODI series between Sri Lanka and New Zealand.

Another new rule is the use of new balls at either end, which hinders spinners' grip to extract turn.

Jayawardene said limited-overs cricket is becoming too generous for batsmen, citing the rule of a free hit after a bowler bowls a no-ball.

Sri Lanka has historically relied on spin bowling to win matches.

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- AP

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