New West Indies T20 league to start in 2013

SIMON EVANS
Last updated 13:44 14/12/2012

Relevant offers

Cricket

Trent Boult, Corey Anderson need tune-up ahead of Black Caps' Aussie test odyssey Black Caps coach Mike Hesson happy as talent pool deepens for busy summer England's Ian Bell quits one-day internationals to prolong test career Phillip Hughes' death to be subject of judicial inquiry from NSW Coroner Ashes 2015: Luck really is a fortune Australia secure tense ODI win over Ireland Rankings dip the only tangible loss from Black Caps African tour Wellington and Christchurch to host New Zealand versus Australia cricket tests South Africa beat Black Caps by 62 runs in ODI series decider in Durban England to host Sri Lanka and Pakistan in test series in 2016

A new franchise-based Twenty20 league will begin play in the Caribbean next year the West Indies Cricket Board said today, filling the hole left by the collapse of Allen Stanford's tournament.

The Stanford 20/20, held in 2006 and 2008, kick-started Caribbean interest in the shortest form of the game but since the collapse of the Texan's financial empire, leading to his imprisonment for fraud, there has been a lack of resources for players.

The West Indies were crowned Twenty20 world champions this year and the West Indies Cricket Board (WICB) has run a lower-key regional tournament to keep top players involved in the shortest format.

But the new league promises to give Caribbean cricket a much needed financial boost too.

The WICB said their agreement with Barbados and New York based merchant bank Verus International would ensure annual funding for new retainer contracts for regional players, above and beyond the 20 main squad members who are contracted.

"This will bring a host of benefits to players and West Indies Cricket in general," WICB president Julian Hunte said.

"A significant number of players at the regional level will benefit through greater financial stability both from playing in the league and from year-round retainer contracts while having an international platform on which to showcase their skills and talent.

"Most importantly is that the league will bring a huge financial injection into the Caribbean and create significant job opportunities across the region in a wide cross section of sectors."

The competition is expected to comprise up to six privately owned city-based teams. No details were immediately available on how those franchises would be created or any potential owners.

Ajmal Khan, chairman and CEO of Verus said there was huge potential for the league.

"We believe that the recently won World Twenty20 is a testament to the quality and excitement of West Indies cricket," he said.

"We intend to utilize the Twenty20 league to further develop and strengthen West Indies cricket by expanding the global fan base as well as the number of West Indian cricketers under regional retainer contracts".

Ad Feedback

- Reuters

Special offers
Opinion poll

Should bouncers be banned from cricket?

Yes - they're too dangerous

Neutral - it is what it is

No - it's just bad luck when it goes wrong

Vote Result

Featured Promotions

Sponsored Content