Ex-Black Caps say NZC turned down offers

Last updated 12:17 16/12/2012
Dion Nash
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DION NASH: "Any board that needs an advisory panel on cricket-specific matters is no board at all."

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Several former Kiwi cricket stars have taken aim at New Zealand Cricket chairman Chris Moller after he accused them of talking the talk but failing to walk the walk.

Former Black Caps Dion Nash, Simon Doull and Craig McMillan, and ex-captain John Parker, all criticised Moller, who went on the attack against former players when he finally commented on the tumultuous Ross Taylor saga at a NZC press conference in Wellington last week.

Moller, a former chief executive of the New Zealand Rugby Union, lamented an apparent reluctance of former top cricketers to become involved in either the board or other key positions in the game, unfavourably comparing their attitude to former All Blacks by noting he had worked at board level with the likes of Jock Hobbs, Graham Mourie and John Graham.

But a host of ex-players hit back yesterday, with Nash describing Moller on radio as "disingenuous" while Doull writes in his Sunday News column today that he was offended by the comments and that he had offered his services for free to NZC and got nowhere.

Parker expressed similar sentiments. "I felt I had a little cricket knowledge and a little management and governance experience but never made it past the 'I'm keen' bit," Parker told Radio Sport. Nash and McMillan made similar protestations over Moller's assessment, with the former saying the process for a board position was riddled with "politics".

Former Black Caps legend Martin Crowe was another to take umbrage.

"I have tried to help the game," he said. "I've made myself available to mentor, coach, select, direct on the board, consult on the committee, and scout. But only the mentoring of Taylor has been accepted.

"I've tried - but not any more."

Nash ruled out running for the board due to family commitments, saying he was "five to 10 years" away from being able to stand.

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