Woodhill says Taylor's treatment unfathomable

Last updated 09:14 15/02/2013
Trent Woodhill
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TRENT WOODHILL: "I just feel bitter towards their treating [of] one of the best human beings I've ever met."

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Former Black Caps assistant coach Trent Woodhill has slammed New Zealand Cricket's treatment of Ross Taylor, claiming he saw the writing on the wall last year.

Woodhill was an assistant to John Wright and told the Sydney Morning Herald this week that the tide was turning against Taylor on the tour of the West Indies last year.

Clearly Taylor's subsequent dumping as Black Caps captain late last year, came as no surprise to Woodhill.

"During the West Indies tour I was really frustrated with the way Ross Taylor was being treated, not by anyone other than the manager and a few of the senior players who weren't giving him the support that he needed," Woodhill said.

"I don't think it was ever about Ross and Brendon. It was always about management. To me, Brendon should want to captain his country and I was all for a split captaincy, but it's just the way it was done [that was the problem].

"After the World Twenty20 I closed the book on New Zealand, but the way Ross was treated and is being treated I just feel bitter towards their treating [of] one of the best human beings I've ever met. Ross Taylor is literally the nicest guy you could ever meet and the most respectful and down to earth, and the way they treated him [was unfathomable]."

While Taylor has since ended his stint away from the Black Caps to feature in the current series against England, Woodhill reckons the only proper solution would be for both new coach Mike Hesson and NZ Cricket chief executive David White to resign over the affair.

Woodhill lost out to Hesson in the race to replace Wright as Black Caps coach.

He has returned to Australia, working with the Melbourne Stars in the Big Bash league, New South Wales and is still involved with the Delhi Daredevils in the IPL.

The Sydney Morning Herald was keen to catch up with the philosophies that have made a Sydney grade cricketer, a valuable coaching commodity.

Naturally, the discussions worked their way through to his Kiwi experiences and why he missed out on the top job.

"The New Zealanders didn't want a foreigner," Woodhill reasoned.

"They had issues with [former Australian coach and director of cricket] John Buchanan - he was ostracised, and still is - and the manager, players' association rep and new CEO [David White] all just wanted a Kiwi in there."

Woodhill was intent on having no hard feelings towards NZ Cricket, given how it had given him his first international job and how he had relished the role, but that has subsequently been trumped by his anger at the treatment of Taylor.

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