Brendon McCullum hopes he and Chris Cairns 'never cross paths' again video

Brendon McCullum retired from international cricket in February.
RYAN PIERSE/GETTY IMAGES

Brendon McCullum retired from international cricket in February.

Brendon McCullum hopes he and former friend and New Zealand cricket team-mate Chris Cairns "never cross paths" again.

McCullum testified against Cairns who was found not guilty of perjury and charges relating to alleged match-fixing at Southwark Crown Court in London last December.

The 35-year-old, who called time on his international career and retired as Black Caps captain in February, said in an interview with Seven Sharp he hopes his career isn't defined by his involvement with Cairns.

Chris Cairns arrives at court during his trial.
PHILIP BROWN/PHOTOSPORT NZ

Chris Cairns arrives at court during his trial.

McCullum felt he had a "moral obligation" as New Zealand's captain to testify, after he claimed Cairns approached him to fix a cricket match in 2008.

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He didn't make a statement until 2011 after admitting he didn't "know" or "understand" that he was "just as in the gun as anyone who's actually approached you".

Brendon McCullum with the bat.
RYAN PIERSE/GETTY IMAGES

Brendon McCullum with the bat.

Cairns and co-accused Andrew Fitch-Holland were found not guilty of all charges after an eight-week trial in London.

McCullum said he didn't have to testify.

"Whether they believed me, or whether they didn't, none of that really matters," he said. 

Brendon McCullum walks off the field after his last toss of the coin.
RYAN PIERSE/GETTY IMAGES

Brendon McCullum walks off the field after his last toss of the coin.

"It wasn't about a guilty or not guilty verdict. It was a matter of fulfilling a moral obligation I felt I had.

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"He was everyone's hero. It's dangerous when you meet your heroes, I guess."

Former Black Cap Lou Vincent and McCullum gave direct evidence to the jury, while former cricketers Shane Bond, Ricky Ponting, Andre Adams, Chris Harris and Kyle Mills also testified at the trial.

McCullum described his involvement in the trial as "horrible" and said he wouldn't want anyone to go through it.

But he said he would do it again.

"I didn't want to be there. The last thing I wanted to do was be in a courtroom testifying against one of my old mates," he said.

"It was certainly not how I was brought up as well. Is it something I would want anyone to go through? Absolutely bloody not.

"Would I do it again? Yes I would."

McCullum's feelings towards Cairns are clear.

"The way it unfolded, and the fact that it became me versus him, was just something I never understood," he said.

"Under pressure, people show their true character. It's not the character I thought I knew and I guess I can never forgive him for that.

"I'm sure he'll get on with his life and I'll get on with mine. Let's hope they never cross paths. I'm done with it now and I want to move on with the rest of my life.

"I sure as hell hope my career's not defined by my involvement with Chris Cairns."

When Cairns, who said his reputation was "scorched" after the trial, was asked what he would say to McCullum after his not guilty verdict, he shrugged.

"Why?" he asked.

McCullum's autobiography Brendon McCullum, Declared is released tomorrow.

 - Stuff

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