New Zealand captain Kane Williamson says DRS miss a close call video

Captain Kane Williamson looks for advice from his slip cordon to support a DRS referral.
PHOTOSPORT

Captain Kane Williamson looks for advice from his slip cordon to support a DRS referral.

Black Caps captain Kane Williamson thought his timing may have been good enough to come out even in his battle with the DRS.

The New Zealand skipper had two notable slip-ups when questioning umpiring decisions during his team's stunning second cricket test win against Pakistan in Hamilton on Tuesday.

Williamson made a poor judgment call when he asked for the use of the Decision Review System (DRS) against opener Azhar Ali off the bowling of Matt Henry as NZ desperately sought their first wicket in Pakistan's second innings.

Colin de Grandhomme reacts to a misssed DRS call while bowling to Sami Aslam of Pakistan during day five of the second ...
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Colin de Grandhomme reacts to a misssed DRS call while bowling to Sami Aslam of Pakistan during day five of the second test at Seddon Park in Hamilton.

READ MORE: NZ win dramatic second test

The captain, fielding at short cover, felt Ali may have edged the delivery but replays showed his bat was some distance from the ball as it passed and New Zealand lost one of their two review uses with the unsuccessful review.

Then just before lunch, Williamson took too long deciding and consulting to review a not out lbw decision on the other Pakistan opener Sami Aslam off the bowling of Colin de Grandhomme. The referral was not allowed as it took more than the 15 seconds required to make following the initial decision of the umpire.

Kane Williamson consults his team-mates.
PHOTOSPORT

Kane Williamson consults his team-mates.

Williamson and his team-mates then suffered the ultimate indignity when a TV replay indicated that Aslam would likely have been given out under DRS.

"I just missed out perhaps on one of them which would have made my stats look a little bit better with the referrals," he said of his failure to get his claim in on time.

"People have gone back on the replay and timed us and perhaps I was maybe in ... just ... slightly. But that's the way it goes. It'd be nice to get every review right but that's the way it happens."

NZ captain Kane Williamson felt he may have got his referral in in time.
PHOTOSPORT

NZ captain Kane Williamson felt he may have got his referral in in time.

"With the first one, I was at cover - it's hard to get an angle on the line of the delivery in that position and we were trying to get the communication. Guys weren't sure."

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The skipper finally got one right late in the day to help sway the test in favour of the hosts when Tim Southee trapped key batsman Younis Khan lbw. Umpire Sundaram Ravi initially ruled not out but Williamson needed little convincing from Southee and wicketkeeper BJ Watling to ask for a referral and the TV replays showed the ball would have struck the stumps as Younis was given out, leaving Pakistan at 218-6 in the all-action final session.

However, the success rate fell soon after when New Zealand asked for a referral on another lbw appeal from Southee that was denied, and the DRS agreed with umpire Ravi that Sohail Khan was not out.

"When it comes down the line thing, the bowler and keeper can say the line's good," Williamson said on the method used on whether to challenge an umpire's ruling.

"When it's a nick thing, when someone's perhaps heard something or maybe there's a time in the match when it could be just relevant to use, if guys maybe think it could be close.

"That all comes into the decision to use them. I think now with the change in rules and how much of the ball needs to hit the stump to overturn, perhaps is in the the favour of someone to review it, with that optimistic approach.

"I think we did that today with Younis - one of the great players of the game and it was a huge wicket for us."

 

 - Stuff

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