Working with next generation in Crowe's future

Last updated 05:00 28/06/2013
Martin Crowe
FRESH START: Cancer has changed the way Martin Crowe is approaching his life.

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A career of talking to young, aspiring athletes about how to deal with the mental pressures associated with sport is something Martin Crowe could look at in the future.

The former New Zealand cricketer, who was in Invercargill yesterday to promote his new autobiography, Raw, which tells of his biggest challenges in life, believed helping young sports stars with their thoughts and emotions was definitely an option as a future career.

Crowe said his book tour around New Zealand was a chance to see how he felt talking about the mental side of sport and the experiences he went through with both cricket, his sacking from Sky Television and beating cancer.

"There is so much opportunity to work with 15 to 19-year-olds to teach them about the mental side and emotional pressures that go with playing sport," Crowe said.

"Some people can handle it and some people can't."

Crowe confessed he struggled to cope with the stress and pressures he faced being under public scrutiny, acknowledging he was thrown into a high level of cricket when he was too young.

He gave a host of examples of players he thought were introduced into the New Zealand cricket team too early.

"Daniel Vettori, Chris Cairns, Adam Parore, even myself."

Coaches and selectors made the mistake of selecting players on their physical ability without looking at how they coped mentally and emotionally, Crowe said.

"I think in cricket they make it (the mistake) all the time."

The problem, in Crowe's opinion, wasn't just limited to cricket.

Crowe, who ended his chemotherapy just a few weeks ago, was taking life easy at present as he continued to fight his way back from lymphoma, a cancer of the immune system.

He blamed his illness on letting every little worry get on top of him, on top of his much-publicised battles which included him being dumped from his role as executive producer of the Sky Sports cricket programme for making comments regarding the state of the New Zealand cricket side at that time.

A focus to take each day as it came, a strategy he used to great success when he faced fast bowlers by taking each ball as it was delivered, was an approach he had used to beat cancer.

Things like watching his diet and continuing counselling were all part of the approach to return to better health, Crowe said.

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- The Southland Times

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