Chris Moller quits amid NZ Cricket cleanout

MARK GEENTY
Last updated 13:03 12/07/2013

New Zealand Cricket chairman Chris Moller is stepping aside amid a cleanout of the board.

Moller, a former New Zealand Rugby Union chief executive confirmed today he wouldn't be seeking re-election in September after three sometimes-turbulent years at the helm.

"I have been chairman of New Zealand Cricket for three years and a director for five years, the same duration that I chose to be involved in New Zealand rugby and being chairman is a hugely time-consuming role," he said.

"I also think it is in the best interests of cricket in New Zealand for a new chairman to be inducted into the International Cricket Council during the tenure of Alan Isaac as president so as to best-facilitate the new chair's entry to the council."

Moller oversaw a period when the governance of NZC came under massive public scrutiny, particularly during the Ross Taylor affair when the captain was removed by coach Mike Hesson in December.

It led to calls for more former international players to offer their knowledge and expertise at board level.

Moller's departure was confirmed today after an NZC special general meeting to adopt a new constitution.

Eight roles on the board will be advertised and current board members Bill Francis, Sir John Hansen, and Therese Walsh won't be seeking re-election. Other board members Stuart Heal, Don Mackinnon and Greg Barclay intend to seek reappointment.

The NZC board members unanimously resolved that they and Moller would remain in their positions until the special general meeting on September 19 to elect the new board.

A board appointments panel, headed by NZC president and former international Stephen Boock, was formed to oversee the selection process of the new board.

The panel includes Auckland chairman Rex Smith, Northern Districts chairman Lachlan Muldowney, Otago chairman Murray Hughes and Sir John Wells, a nominee of Sport New Zealand. Board positions will be publicly advertised.

- Fairfax Media

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