Mohammad Asif to open up over spot-fixing

Last updated 07:14 20/08/2013
Mohammad Asif
Reuters
HE'LL TALK: Pakistan cricketer Mohammad Asif arrives for a hearing at the Court of Arbitration for Sport in Lausanne last February.

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Banned Pakistan pace bowler Mohammad Asif has agreed to reveal details of spot-fixing to the Anti-Corruption and Security Unit of the International Cricket Council (ICC).

Asif, 30, who finally admitted last week to his involvement in spot-fixing during the 2010 Lord's test against England, submitted an apology and agreed to cooperate with the authorities after meeting with Pakistan Cricket Board officials on Monday.

He was banned by the ICC for seven years, two of which were suspended, along with former captain Salman Butt and fast bowler Mohammad Amir in early 2011.

The trio later served jail sentences in Britain after being found guilty of cheating and corruption by a crown court.

"I told the PCB officials I am ready to cooperate in every way with them and the ICC," Asif told Reuters.

"I don't know whether I will get a chance to play for Pakistan again but whatever happens I want everyone to know I want to make amends for my actions."'

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