NZ Cricket keeps faith with Hot Spot technology

MARK GEENTY
Last updated 05:00 12/10/2013

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New Zealand Cricket plans to continue using the controversial Hot Spot technology when the West Indies visit despite the system being axed in Australia.

Channel Nine, which holds the broadcast rights for test cricket in Australia, won't be using the infra-red replays for next month's Ashes series due to cost and the doubts over its accuracy which were raised during the series in England.

But NZC has no such concerns, and its head of operations, Lindsay Crocker, confirmed Sky TV would continue to use Hot Spot to check for ball on bat, as well as Virtual Eye ball tracking for decision reviews.

"We don't plan on doing anything different," Crocker said.

"The more technology you can bring to a DRS [Decision Review System] discussion, the better the quality of your decision. We're a little surprised to see Hot Spot come off the table in Australia."

Crocker said Hot Spot was clearly not foolproof, but it was still an important tool in the DRS, used alongside other technology.

NZC's arrangement with Sky was different to that across the Tasman, where Cricket Australia engages Channel Nine, which provides all the technology for the DRS.

NZC partially funds the technology used by Sky and said the cost was "nowhere near" the reported A$250,000 (NZ$285,000) for Channel Nine to use Hot Spot in a series.

Crocker expected the West Indies would have no issue with Hot Spot being used when the playing conditions are finalised for the three tests in December.

But India's tour in January-February would not feature the DRS, given India's vehement opposition to it.

"It's pretty well known what their views are [on the DRS]. It hasn't been raised with India and won't be raised."

The West Indies series will also usher in the new rules on DRS, recently approved by the ICC. It allows teams who have used one or two reviews to have them topped back up to two after 80 overs.

The DRS for lbw and catches is not being used in New Zealand's current series in Bangladesh due to the cost.

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- Fairfax Media

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