Troubled Trott helped turn Otago Volts around

LOGAN SAVORY
Last updated 05:00 27/11/2013
Jonathan Trott
Reuters
REST AND RECOVERY: Jonathan Trott is heading back to the UK with a stress-related illness.

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Otago Cricket Association boss Ross Dykes says he is saddened to hear of former Otago batsman Jonathan Trott's Ashes tour-ending illness.

The South African-born English batsman is returning home from Australia, saying he was struggling to cope with stress.

"My priority now is to take a break from cricket so that I can focus on my recovery," Trott said.

It was with the Otago Volts where Trott announced himself to many on the cricket stage before he moved onto play for England.

Then Volts coach Mike Hesson recruited Trott to play in Dunedin during the 2005-06 season.

He was one of the best in the New Zealand domestic scene that season, scoring 455 runs at an average of 91 in the one-day competition and 275 runs at an average of 39.28 in the four-day competition.

As a result of his performances he won the State Medal at the time for the best domestic player in New Zealand.

Dykes credited Trott as one of the key figures in helping turn around the fortunes of Otago cricket.

"He made a big contribution for us when we were finding our feet and establishing ourselves as a better cricket team. And he was a very good team member as well, I remember him fondly and it's sad to hear he's got his problems.

"Clearly they are deeper than just what went on on the field, we wish him all the best."

Dykes added that Trott's problems was another indication that many people probably underestimated the demands on cricketers to maintain themselves at the top level.

"It's a very lonely game and when something takes five days to unfold, and you're under pressure for five days, I think we all underestimate the mental side of cricket, and you never know what's going on behind the facade do you."

"It's certainly very sad to hear and I do hope he recovers and comes back to cricket because he's certainly done a fantastic job."

Trott is the third England player to quit a tour in the past decade due to stress-related issues. Marcus Trescothick in 2006 and Michael Yardy withdrew from the World Cup in 2011.

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