Lou Vincent county game under investigation

Last updated 16:48 07/12/2013

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New Zealand cricketer Lou Vincent played in an English County match that is being investigated by the England and Wales Cricket Board. 

Picking on Vincent's confirmation on Thursday that he is "co-operating" with an anti-corruption investigation led by the International Cricket Council, at least two newspapers yesterday focused on a match the former Black Caps top order batsman played in England.

The London Telegraph newspaper claimed yesterday that a 2011 match between Sussex and Kent in Hove was being investigated.  The match attracted suspicious activity with online betting sites, with one reporting turnover of NZ$28m. The match was also televised live in India.

Vincent played for Sussex who lost the limited overs match by 14 runs.  

The Telegraph reported that the ICC had looked into the match without producing any disciplinary action or criminal proceedings. But Sussex has admitted some of their players had reported being approached to fix the match.

According to the newspaper, the England and Wales Cricket Board's own anti-corruption unit has picked up the case but won't confirm whether the match is part of the ICC investigation into Vincent.

The Times of India newspaper also reported yesterday that a Sussex match from 2011 was being looked at.

Vincent also played for Worcestershire, Lancashire and Northamptonshire as well as in the Indian Cricket League, Bangladesh Premier League and Zimbabwe's domestic competition along with representing Auckland and New Zealand. He also had a stint as batting coach with Hong Kong.

He confirmed on Thursday that he is co-operating with an ICC investigation into match-fixing but said he wouldn't comment further until the investigation was completed.

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In confirming some of their former players were being investigated, New Zealand Cricket said none of the players involved in the allegations were current internationals and the matches hadn't been played in New Zealand or been matches under New Zealand jurisdiction.

The ICC's process if its corruption unit finds a case to answer is to notify players and their national associations before holding a confidential hearing before an anti-corruption panel.  

After the hearing, the tribunal will determine if any offences have been committed under the ICC's anti-corruption code. Its decision would include any sanctions and the length of them. Sanctions can range from six month bans to life. The tribunal also has the discretion to impose fines.

- Fairfax Media

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