Slowly does it for Central Districts' star turn

MURRAY HILLS
Last updated 05:00 04/01/2014
Marty Kain
CHARLOTTE CURD/Fairfax NZ
SPIN MASTER: Central Stags spin bowler Marty Kain at work in the nets.

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Marty Kain is a pretty relaxed type of character off the field.

But toss him a cricket ball and he gets serious.

The 25-year-old from Nelson isn't one who will whip a ball past the bat, rather he's the type who will use guile rather speed to nip out the most stubborn of batsmen.

The slow left-arm orthodox spinner has been the standout performer for the Stags in their two Twenty20 games at New Plymouth's Pukekura Park this week.

While the champagne corks have not popped for the Stags with losses to the Auckland Aces and the Wellington Firebirds, Kain has impressed with his bowling.

He bagged four wickets for 17 runs against the Aces on Monday and backed that up with two wickets for six runs off one over in the 29-run loss to the Firebird's in the six-over bash on New Year's Day.

"Getting four wickets is always nice in Twenty20, you can get bashed around a bit," he said after a net session.

"It's ball by ball for sure. You never know when the next ball will go sailing out of the park."

Kain said he liked playing at Pukekura Park.

"It's a great ground. The boys love playing here. It's a good place to stay, a bit like Nelson. But I don't know about the weather . . . the climate doesn't match Nelson."

Kain said it had been a tough campaign for the Stags so far.

"But anything can happen. I'm sure we're not too far from a win. We've four games left, that's four wins. Cricket is a funny game, things can change so quickly. We just have to prepare the best we can . . . take care of the controllables. Some things you can't control. Do that and the odds are in your favour."

Like any bowler, Kain doesn't like getting hit for six.

"It happens. You just have to stay relaxed. But it's hard in the heat of battle. You just have to walk back to your mark and focus on the next delivery.

"That bat is something you can't control."

Kain has been with the Stags for three years having played for Canterbury before that.

"I grew up in Nelson but went to Lincoln University in Christchurch where I did valuation and property management," he said.

"I'm working in real estate in Nelson now, it's pretty busy but it's good being able to get away.

"I'm lucky, I work with good people and they take care of business while I'm away."

As for the New Plymouth nets, Kain said they rate highly.

"They're as good as any around the country. It's a great asset and by having them, you have games at the park."

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