Q and A with Black Caps speedster Adam Milne

MARK GEENTY
Last updated 05:00 15/01/2014
Adam Milne
PETER MEECHAM/Fairfax NZ
UNLEASHED: Black Caps fast bowler Adam Milne.

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Black Caps fast bowling find Adam Milne sits down for a Q & A with Mark Geenty ahead of the second T20 against West Indies, tonight in Wellington.

Q. At what age did you realise you could bowl genuinely fast?

"At the start of high school I was a runty kid and bowled little mediums. Then at the end of sixth form [at Palmerston North Boys' High School] I started bowling a lot quicker than I had before and that's when I thought if I run in hard I can bowl quicker than a lot of people."

Q. You seem a mild mannered character for a fast bowler, have team-mates like Mitchell McClenaghan been at you to get angry?

"It's probably something I need to improve. I'm not a big trash talker and not overly aggressive towards the batsmen. It can probably give me that bit of an extra edge."

Q. Who was your fast bowling idol growing up?

"I always enjoyed watching Shane Bond play, he was the quickest New Zealand guy around. Then obviously Brett Lee, James Anderson and Dale Steyn were all pretty good to watch for their skills as well as their pace."

Q. How much influence has Bond had on your bowling?
"I've worked with him since I was 17 when he came away to Champions League with the Stags. He's been really good, having been at the top level he knows what's required and the discipline you need."

Q. What about variations like swing and a slower ball?

"You realise that pace is not everything, you have to do something else to create a bit of doubt. That inswing is something I've worked on for a couple of years with Bondy and it's starting to come right. I've got a couple of options for a slower ball and they're coming along nicely."

Q. Injuries are an occupational hazard, are you getting better at managing and prevention?

"Recovery is pretty key. At the top speed you've always got niggles and I haven't been in perfect condition since the start of the season. It's about doing the little things like the gym and conditioning. If you look at Mitchell Johnson who's come back into some amazing form, he said he really worked on strengthening his legs. You've got to have good strong legs to withstand the load you're putting on your body."

Q. You played in a Chatham Cup winning football team [Wairarapa United] in 2011. Is the football career on ice now?

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"That was a good bit of fun, but I don't know how much longer I can do it for now. It might be frowned upon by NZC if I got injured playing football."

Q. Did football ever take precedence over cricket?

"It did at high school for a while. I stopped playing cricket for a couple of years; my brothers both played football and I just followed them. Then in sixth and seventh form I got back into cricket and started making a bit more progress and thought it was time to give it a crack."

Q. The Indian Premier League is always a hot topic, have you put your name forward for next month's player auction?

"I haven't put my name forward as yet. I've considered it but I'm not too worried about it. I just want to do the best for my country and get in as much cricket as I can and get my body strong. Obviously everyone would love to play in the IPL, more so for the players who are there and the experience you can get. If I went I'd never get the big money like some of the other boys."

- The Dominion Post

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