New Zealand set to lose $50m in cricket deal

MICHAEL FIELD
Last updated 11:28 27/01/2014
Sridharan Sriram.
DRAWCARD: Former Indian international player Sridharan Sriram.

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New Zealand Cricket will lose $50.9 million over the next eight years if a proposed change to international cricket administration goes ahead.

The influential national weekly India Today worked out the numbers for all the members of the International Cricket Council (ICC) which this week votes on a proposal to pay more to the big cricketing nations of India, England and Australia.

Although New Zealand appears to be a big financial loser under the proposal, NZC's Martin Snedden has given it some support.

India Today, which said it had obtained the confidential ICC Position Paper that outlines the financial arrangements, said they had calculated the ICC revenue between 2015 and 2023 at US$2.5 billion (NZ$3 billion).

Under the existing arrangement each nation would take US$117.5 million.

The proposed changes would see New Zealand's take fall to US$75.5 million, a drop of US$42 million (NZ$50.9 million).

India would gain US$451 million, England US$56 million and Australia US$30 million.

India Today says the draft paper, which has been leaked selectively, comes up for discussion at the ICC meeting in Dubai on this week.

"As of now, New Zealand has said openly that it will side with India but there is silence from the other two neighbours – Sri Lanka and Bangladesh - on the draft paper," India Today said.

"Let's be honest about one thing, cricket today is not a gentleman's game played by men in flannels. The commerce in cricket has grown so huge and TV rights mean such huge moolah, to think of an India-Bangladesh series is laughable."

It said that when India played abroad, the host nations made huge money by way of TV rights.

"It is not necessary that India provides the best cricket, but the sheer mention of India means the money being made by the host nation goes up," India Today said.

"So if India is going to tell New Zealand - where the team is currently playing - that it deserves to get more money, there is nothing wrong in it.

"The truth is, today anyone who buys TV rights for an India series generates big money.

"What is wrong in India demanding such money as it is because of India such money is being raked in?"

The revenue model in the draft had something for smaller nations "though to imagine that India and the minnows should get the same money is bizarre".

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