New Zealand win cricket, India win metaphor

MICHAEL FIELD
Last updated 13:17 10/02/2014
MS Dhoni
Getty Images
ALL NOT LOST: India captain MS Dhoni looks skyward during his team's second consecutive loss to the Black Caps in Hamilton.

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What to do when you're an Indian reporter travelling with the world's richest - but still losing - cricket team?

You roll out the superlatives and on the back of New Zealand's first test win yesterday at Eden Park, the Times of India's Bobilli Vijay Kumar has used a fair bit of thesaurus.

"Like a monster wave, it began somewhere in the heart of a rampaging sea, promising to develop into something the world hasn't seen in a long, long while; by the time it reached the shore, however, it dwindled into a humbled trickle, barely kissing the feet of stupefied onlookers."

That was just the intro.

Kumar wrote of Indian fans "who kept the tension away by their cadent chants and funny quips, plunged into disbelieving silence as a potentially monumental chase degenerated into a parody of errors..."

He told the three million readers of the world's largest selling English language daily of the "stunning, almost suicidal, counter-attack" by Ravindra Jadeja and MS Dhoni who kept India's hopes alive.

"New Zealand held on to their nerves whenever they threatened to run away for a remarkable victory; their bowlers kept steaming away with fire and intent, to pluck out the nine wickets needed on the fourth day of this amazing Test," Kumar reported.

He said Dhoni's approach was baffling: "He even looked distant and aloof, rather than calm and collected."

Kumar also wrote a separate piece on the Black Caps, with another interesting intro.

"Well after the Eden Park emptied out and the shadows lengthened, New Zealand's players marched towards the middle of the pitch with beer bottles in hand; they gathered in a circle, and with arms on each other's shoulders, celebrated a hard-fought, well-deserved victory."

The rest of the Indian press were more restrained,

"In a pulsating test of such fortune swings and emotions, it can be hard to pick a point where the match changed course on the decisive fourth day," S Dinakar of The Hindu reported.

Then he pinned it - Virat Kohli's dismissal and its manner. Caught behind by the keeper: "It was a waste of a wicket."

On NDTV, legendary India skipper Sunil Gavaskar - who is currently in New Zealand - found some positives.

"It was one of the better run chases by India on foreign soil that I have seen. I am pleased with the way batted in the fourth innings on a worn out wicket," he said.

The second test starts in Wellington on Friday.

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