Bidwell: Sights, smells and sounds of Chittagong

HAMISH BIDWELL
Last updated 05:00 27/03/2014
Chittagong
Getty Images

ON THE BALL: Local kids play street cricket alongside railway tracks in Chittagong, Bangladesh.

Relevant offers

Cricket

Trent Boult, Corey Anderson need tune-up ahead of Black Caps' Aussie test odyssey Cheteshwar Pujara holds firm for India against Sri Lanka Black Caps coach Mike Hesson happy as talent pool deepens for busy summer England's Ian Bell quits one-day internationals to prolong test career Phillip Hughes' death to be subject of judicial inquiry from NSW Coroner Ashes 2015: Luck really is a fortune Australia secure tense ODI win over Ireland Rankings dip the only tangible loss from Black Caps African tour Wellington and Christchurch to host New Zealand versus Australia cricket tests South Africa beat Black Caps by 62 runs in ODI series decider in Durban

OPINION: Doesn't take much to give you a fright over here.

An early knock at the door did the trick yesterday morning. Just turned out to be a thirsty member of a one-man Barmy Army.

Our man, from Sunderland, had arrived in Chittagong the night before. Having followed England through Sri Lanka and India, he regarded himself as well seasoned in surviving the sub-continent. Never seen a place like Chittagong, though.

The England team, along with various ICC staff, broadcasters and the Black Cap, s are staying in a hotel where it is said you can get a beer in the bar. In theory, Bangladesh is dry, but it appears you can find a drink if you need one.

Our man did, stood, as he was, outside the door with pen and paper and having changed from his navy Barmy Army shirt and cap into white ones.

"What's the name of that hotel, like? I don't need a beer now, mind. But by 12 o'clock I will."

He'd had a bad start to his stay, showering with the bathroom window and curtain open. When he realised he was being watched intently by a man in the next building he resolved never to make that mistake again.

The Englishman and I first met in the hotel lobby, at 5.30am. The 5am call to prayers at the mosque 20 metres down the alley from the hotel could wake the dead, and a friendly Anglo Saxon face isn't the worse thing to find after shambling downstairs to feed a nicotine habit.

It's not just the sounds from the mosque that catch your attention, but the sights and smells. Waist-high concrete cubicles have been erected outside, where people squat over a hole and go about their business.

As long as you can put up with the mosquitoes nibbling at your feet, jandals are a good option over here. But they weren't the other night, when a massive storm washed the contents from those cubicles down the alley.

Nothing a quick shower couldn't fix and, being the modest type, I always keep the curtains closed.

Ad Feedback

- Fairfax Media

Comments

Special offers
Opinion poll

Should bouncers be banned from cricket?

Yes - they're too dangerous

Neutral - it is what it is

No - it's just bad luck when it goes wrong

Vote Result

Featured Promotions

Sponsored Content