100,000 protesters expected at Brazil game

TALES AZZONI
Last updated 07:39 26/06/2013

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About 100,000 people are expected in a protest to demand better public services and to complain about the cost of the World Cup before Brazil plays Uruguay in the semifinals of the Confederations Cup.

Local officials have declared a holiday in Belo Horizonte and authorities say they are expecting confrontations with the demonstrators.

Belo Horizonte has had some of the most violent clashes between police and protesters since the country was swept by a wave of demonstrations calling for better education, transport and health services.

There were no major protests in the city on Tuesday, but groups closed three main roads demanding that public officials pay more attention to them.

FIFA President Sepp Blatter will be in Belo Horizonte on Wednesday. Football's governing body said that security has been increased because of the protests, but it wasn't immediately known if any changes were expected in Belo Horizonte because of Blatter's presence.

Messages sent to FIFA on Tuesday were not immediately answered.

"I'm in favor of the protests," Brazil striker Fred said Tuesday. "The people deserve better. But it has to be done without violence and without vandalism. Hopefully the demonstrations will be peaceful tomorrow, without confrontations with the police."

Protesters have filled cities across the country to air a wide spectrum of grievances, including the high cost of hosting next year's World Cup and the 2016 Olympics.

There have been many violent protests before Confederations Cup matches, including in Brasilia, Rio de Janeiro, Salvador and Fortaleza.

On Saturday, police estimated that about 60,000 demonstrators gathered in a central square in Belo Horizonte before heading toward the Mineirao Stadium ahead of the match between Japan and Mexico. Riot police fired rubber bullets and used gas bombs and pepper spray to keep the protesters from advancing near the venue.

The government is projecting that $13.3 billion will be spent on stadiums, airport renovations and other projects for the World Cup, with an estimated $3.5 billion on the 12 venues.

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- AP

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